Inuit Climate Change Patrol

The people of Thule in northern Greenland are the last vestige of the Inuit culture, the only survivors of an ancient way of life that has disappeared in Alaska and Canada. Supporting their culture and fighting its cultural extinction is the soul and the goal of the Inuit Climate Change Patrol Project.

 

In Thule today sled dogs are still used and the inhabitants go in search of their livelihood in cloth-lined kayaks, but we are witnessing the last generation of true Inughuit hunters. Most of  these people are between 45 and 60 years old and the next generation aren’t continuing in these traditions… Are we witnessing the last dynasty of the Kings of Thule? This fear, not to mention alarm, which Larramendi glimpsed during the Three Years Across the Arctic Expedition between 1990 and 1993, is the germ of the current project: “Young people are going to work to Denmark or to theThule air base, or remain jobless in Qaanaaq. Therefore the trend is clear: tradition is quietly and slowly vanishing as in so many other parts of the world”.

Inuit Climate Change Patrol, a circuit of 1,000 km

A circuit of 1,000 km by dog sled over the ice cap and the sea ice driven by the Thule Inuit themselves in the company of a team of scientists and communicators, in order to study and monitor the impact on climate change in the remote region of the Humboldt Glacier, in Northwest Greenland, a usual place for polar bear breeding used as a hunting ground for centuries by the Inuit hunters.

The Patrol will start a regular yearly spring survey in remote and little studied northern Greenland, doing checks on the state of the sea ice, the ice sheet of Greenland  and the polar bear population, as well as monitoring the impact on other animals in this region, all of them of vital importance for the Thule region.

The Inuit Climate Change Patrol aims to witness and communicate to the world what the impact that of climate change is in one of the remotest, biologically most significant regions of the Arctic, where it is having a most dramatic effect.

Ancient techniques still used today

The Inuit Climate Change Patrol aims to support the traditional way of life, creating jobs and drawing attention to this little corner of our world, its current situation, and its extraordinary potential.

Involve local people in a new type of tourism

The Inuit Climate Change Patrol wants to support the local economy of the Thule region, based exclusively in the creation of jobs and tourism related to the maintenance of the cultural heritage.  

 

Our commitments

Environmental sustainability. We believe in a responsible tourism with unspoilt nature of Greenland, so all our trips are planned to have the least possible impact on the environment.

Safety. All our guides are expert about Greenland and know when either it is or it is not convinient to carry out an activity. Our safety records are unmatchable.

Local population. Our Inuit Climate Change Patrol   ensures the maintanance of Inuit traditions by involving local people in utilization of a sustainable tourism.

Inuit Windsled 

To collaborate in the deepest knowledge of the most unfamiliar places on the planet and do so without affecting ecosystems. This is the philosophy that marks the Inuit Windsled Project, the only totally ecological vehicle designed for research in Polar lands.

Based on the ancient knowledge of the Inuit peoples, the Windsled developers have managed to create a means of transportation that combines tradition with modern means through kites that harness aeolian energy.

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Inuit Climate Change Patrol;

In Thule today sled dogs are still used and the inhabitants go in search of their livelihood in cloth-lined kayaks, but we are witnessing the last generation of true Inuit hunters. Most of these people are between 45 and 60 years old and the next generation aren’t continuing in these traditions… Are we witnessing  the last dynasty of the Kings of Thule?  

This fear is the germ of the Inuit Climate Change Patrol, current project led by Ramon Larramendi (founder of Greenland.net)

learn more